Larry Olmsted's new book serves as a handy guide to what items consumers should avoid, and how to find and identify the real deal.

By Tim Cebula
Updated: July 21, 2016

Anyone interested in the lowdown on fake food scams involving olive oil, Parmesan cheese, wine, seafood, and the like would do well to grab a copy of Real Food, Fake Food ($28; Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill; on bookshelves July 12). Food journalist Larry Olmsted explores all the outrages: sawdust in Parmesan cheese; lobster rolls that contain no lobster; adulterated olive oils sold for premium prices. It's a fascinating read that sheds light on our under-regulated food industry. The book also serves as a handy guide to what items consumers should avoid, and how to find and identify the real deal. Required reading for cooks who genuinely care about quality and health.