November 02, 2015

Yesterday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service announced a recall of 167,427 pounds of ground beef products packaged by Omaha, Nebraskas's All American Meats, Inc. The ground beef, which was produced October 16, may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.

The recall includes:

  • 80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef 80% Lean 20% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 62100.
  • 80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef 73% Lean 27% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 60100.
  • 60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Round 85% Lean 15% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 68560.
  • 60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 68160.
  • 60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 63130.
  • 80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 63100.
Some strains of E. coli bacteria can make individuals who eat it very sick. Symptoms of an infection include stomach cramping, vomiting, and diarrhea. Healthy adults typically recover from an E. coli infection in about a week, but children, elderly individuals, and people with compromised immune systems may be sick for much longer. These three groups are also at risk for hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening form of kidney failure.

The ground beef was shipped nationwide, so check your beef packages for establishment number “EST. 20420” inside the USDA mark of inspection. If you have the possibly contaminated beef, throw it away, or return it to the store where you purchased it.

According to the USDA, cooking ground beef to a temperature of 160° F is enough to kill harmful bacteria, including E. coli. The only way to know your food's internal temperature is to use a food thermometer.

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