September 20, 2015

I constantly find myself hungry at 2 p.m., even on days I eat lunch. Without fail, I will be reaching for snacks in the early afternoon every day. That's why I realized I needed to change what I was eating for lunch, rather than supplementing my hungry belly with junk later in the day.

While researching better lunch options, I found myself going back to sushi. Maybe it was a craving for a salmon skin roll, or maybe a hankering for nigiri, but I just kept returning to sashimi-style fish. I realized that the high-protein content found in raw fish and the filling fiber of brown rice are two things that could keep hunger away longer and cure my cravings for sushi at the same time.

That's how my sushi bowl recipes were created. They are inspired by popular raw fish dishes and serve up at least 30 grams of protein in each dish. Read on for the inspiration behind this bowl and why I'm no longer reaching for the snack!

Hawaiian Style Tuna Poke Bowl(Serves: 1 | Prep time: 15 minutes)

Poke (pok-ay) is a Hawaiian dish made of fish that is typically marinated in citrus and shallot. Similar to tartare, Poke is served cold and most commonly as an appetizer. I pair mine with rice and fresh cucumber for a filling lunch. Feel free to add any fresh veg options, and switch up your rice with grains such as quinoa.

4 ounces tuna sashimi, cubed1 teaspoon minced ginger2 teaspoons minced shallot1 teaspoon sesame oil1 teaspoon Ponzu sauce1 teaspoon low-sodium soy sauce1/3 cup cooked brown riceCucumber slicesSlices of green onion, for garnishSesame seeds, for garnish

  1. In a small bowl, stir together ginger, shallot, sesame oil, Ponzu sauce, and low-sodium soy sauce. Toss tuna with marinade and let sit in the fridge for at least 10 minutes.
  2. In a bowl, top brown rice with cucumber slices and tuna. Pour remaining marinade to season the rice, if desired.
  3. Garnish with green onion slices and sesame seeds. Enjoy!
Note: Do not keep tuna from the fridge for an extended period of time. Also, be sure to use clean cutting boards and knives while working with sashimi-style fish.

SERVES 1CALORIES 295; FAT 11g (sat 2.2g, mono 4g, poly 3.9g); PROTEIN 29g; CARB 18g; FIBER 2g; CHOL 43mg; IRON 2mg; SODIUM 422mg; CALC 26mg

Sushi-grade fish can be hard to find, so be sure to check with your local grocer on where to find the best options. My local Central Market had sashimi-grade fish in the freezer and simply instructed to let it thaw in the fridge before use. Some Asian fish markets or specialty grocery stores will sell fresh fish for use in sushi. Just be sure it is labeled 'Sushi or Sashimi-Grade.'

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