We all want to get the most out of our spring garden, but how? To find out, we consulted an expert who told us about his secret weapon. It's organic, it's not too expensive, it ensures your plants grow quicker and larger, and... it smells.

Matthew A. Moore
May 01, 2017

Springtime means gardens full of strawberries, lettuce, peas, carrots, broccoli, and more. The satisfying end result to springtime gardening is always the aforementioned delicious, ripe-and-ready produce, but you know what kind of stinks? The waiting part. After you plant everything, you have to keep it watered and patiently wait for plants to grow large enough for harvesting. If only there were some way to expedite the process so you can enjoy the fruits of your labor quicker... Some sort of secret weapon, if you will. Well, we consulted a seasoned expert with over 30+ years in the horticulture game and, as it turns out, there is! 

The secret weapon? Chicken poop! Yes, you read that right. Chicken poo should be your go-to for making your spring garden grow quicker, more beautiful, and giving you bigger plants and vegetables. It's chock-full of nitrogen and other nutrients essential for plant growth, and when it comes to organic fertilizers it's virtually unrivaled in results. Your plants will thrive if you use it, and heck, you might even end up growing some produce that's the envy of your local farmers!

First and foremost, the key to using chicken poop is to make sure that it's been composted. According to Neil Moore, owner of Plant the Earth Garden Center and our go-to horticulture expert, attempting to use poop that hasn't been composted is a nonstarter. Because of its high levels of nitrogen and other nutrients, non-composted poo can "burn" and even kill your plants. So Step 1 is to ensure you have the composted variety—here's a link to a brand you can purchase online if you don't have the resources to acquire your own chicken excrement for a compost pile. Buying it online is also much faster than going DYI with it.

Step 2? Work the poop into the soil before you plant. You can sprinkle it in after if you must, but for best results mix it into the soil beforehand. That way your rootball is exposed to those vital nutrients as soon as it's in the ground. After planting, just make sure your flora is getting the necessary amounts of water and sunlight. The nitrogen-rich chicken poop will do the rest, giving your plants a boost and helping them grow quicker—think of it as a mushroom and your plants are Mario—and possibly even increasing the chances of a bigger haul come harvest-time, since chicken poop can augment the size of both your plants and their bounty.

Just don't forget the most important step, Step 3: Store your composted chicken poop in a dry, out-of-the-way area like a shed. Do your best to make sure it doesn't get wet. It's chicken poop, after all, and it stinks. Happy planting!