How to Cook Chinese

Learn how to create healthy versions of classic Chinese dishes. You may never do take-out again.
Text and Recipes by Nina Simonds / Photography by Randy Mayor / Styling by Mary Catherine Muir

China is home to more than a fifth of the world's population―a country so vast and ancient that unique regional styles were bound to develop. And they did, shaped by climate, geography, and ingredient availability, to the point that "Chinese cooking" is now not one but many different cuisines. The varied styles have had millennia to thoroughly define themselves, gaining adherents, experts, and enthusiastic diners along the way.

How We Lightened Chinese
Most classic Chinese cuisine is inherently healthful because of its reliance on vegetables, vegetable oils, stir-frying, and fat-free condiments. But sodium levels can get pretty high because of many condiments such as soy, oyster, and hoisin sauces are higher in sodium. Our solution? Low-sodium soy sauce. We also kept the fat down by using less vegetable oil than traditional recipes call for.