Healthy British Fare

We're following the torch to England for the 2012 Summer Olympics. So, take a jaunt across the pond with us as we explore classic British recipes.

Beer-Battered Fish and Chips

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Classic British Fare

If you can't make it to London for this summer's Olympics, don't say cheerio to all the fun. When you serve up the classic flavors of the game's royal host you'll be ready to take a front row seat to all the action.

First up, is Beer-Battered Fish and Chips.

All hail to this classic English pub grub. We use Alaskan cod and serve with malt vinegar.

View Recipe: Beer-Battered Fish and Chips

English Cottage Pie

Photo: John Autry

English Cottage Pie

Leftover mashed potatoes are mixed with white cheddar cheese to form the top crust for this British pub-food staple. Ground beef is traditionally used, but lean ground turkey will work, as well. Brown the crust under the broiler for a minute or two, if you like.

View Recipe: English Cottage Pie

Lemon-Earl Grey Squares

Photo: Romulo Yanes

Lemon-Earl Grey Squares

Classic lemon bars are given a regal upgrade with the addition of Earl Grey Tea, a black tea named after Prime Minister Charles Grey.

View Recipe: Lemon-Earl Grey Squares

Pimm's Cup

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Pimm's Cup

This refreshing drink gets most of its flavor from Pimm's No. 1, a gin-based aperitif with fruit juices and spices developed in London in 1823 by James Pimm. It was originally enjoyed with oysters, but we think cucumber spears make a delicious garnish.

View Recipe: Pimm's Cup

Toasted Almond and Cherry Scones

Photo: Ellen Silverman

Toasted Almond and Cherry Scones

This British quick bread will be the crown jewel of your afternoon tea. It comes together in less than 30 minutes and is best served warm from the oven. Substitute an equal amount of chopped pistachios or walnuts for the almonds, if you prefer.

View Recipe: Toasted Almond and Cherry Scones

Cranberry-Orange Trifle

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Cranberry-Orange Trifle

The trifle is a classic dessert that originated in England centuries ago. To aid with the demands of modern busy schedules, we suggest preparing the cranberries and pastry cream up to three days ahead. Then, simply assemble and refrigerate the trifle up to 24 hours before you plan to serve it.

View Recipe: Cranberry-Orange Trifle

Classic Scones

Photo: Randy Mayor

Classic Scones

Enjoy these barely-sweet scones with strawberry jam and a spot of tea. Try substituting other dried fruits, such as cranberries or blueberries, for the currants.

View Recipe: Classic Scones

Shepherd's Pie

Photo: Karry Hosford

Shepherd's Pie

This recipe reigns as the ultimate English comfort food. With ground sirloin, creamy mashed potatoes, and a sprinkle of cheddar cheese, your family will never know it's low in calories.

View Recipe: Shepherd's Pie

Chocolate Shortbread

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Chocolate Shortbread

Know by the Brits as biscuits, and by Americans as cookies—no matter how the name game crumbles, you're bound to love this not-too-sweet treat.

View Recipe: Chocolate Shortbread

Stilton-Stuffed Baked Pears

Photo: Susan Byrnes

Stilton-Stuffed Baked Pears

Stilton, an English blue cheese, is a classic accompaniment for pears. Use ripe but firm pears that will hold their shape once cooked. You can substitute toasted walnuts for pecans.

View Recipe: Stilton-Stuffed Baked Pears

English Summer Pudding

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

English Summer Pudding

This is a low-fat version of the classic English molded desserts that alternate layers of cake or bread, fruit, and custard. We've left out the custard here, allowing the fresh berries to take a kingly role.

View Recipe: English Summer Pudding

Mixed Citrus Marmalade

Photo: Randy Mayor

Mixed Citrus Marmalade

Tart marmalade is delicious on scones or breakfast breads. This recipe produces classic British-style bitter marmalade. If you prefer less bitterness, use only half the grapefruit rind called for in the recipe. Keep in mind that the mixture will thicken as it cools.

View Recipe: Mixed Citrus Marmalade

Brown Sugar Shortbread

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Brown Sugar Shortbread

Entertaining a crowd of Team USA fans? These double easily; just bake each batch separately for the best results.

View Recipe: Brown Sugar Shortbread

Blue Cheese Yorkshire Pudding

Photo: Howard L. Puckett  

Blue Cheese Yorkshire Pudding

These Yorkshire puddings are given a subtle kick with the addition of blue cheese. Though they're named after the largest county in England, these individually-portioned confections are perfectly sized with some help from muffin cups.

View Recipe: Blue Cheese Yorkshire Pudding

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http://www.cookinglight.com/food/world-cuisine/british-recipes-00412000076392/