Summer Produce Guide

O summer... Celebrate with us the sweet joys of fruits and the luscious crunch of vegetables.

Healthy Summer Produce

Photo: Gentyl & Hyers

Healthy Summer Produce

For anyone who enjoys food and cooking, summer offers the finest ingredients—fresh local produce from the garden, farmers' market, and grocery—to make any dish superlative. The key is to keep things simple and let the quality of seasonal ingredients shine through. It's so easy, enjoyable, and affordable to indulge your cravings for fresh fruits and vegetables this time of year.

Peaches

Photo: Oxmoor House

Peaches

The state fruit of Georgia, peaches are in season from May to late September. To select, look for fruit that is firm; with a taut, unblemished skin; and no signs of bruising or wrinkles. If you smell peaches when you walk up to the stand, you know they are ripe.

Recipes: 
Peach Mojitos 
Grilled Peaches Over Arugula with Goat Cheese and Prosciutto
Grilled Sirloin Skewers with Peaches and Peppers 
Peach Chutney 
Peach Ice Cream

See More: Our Favorite Peach Recipes

Watermelon

Photo: Oxmoor House

Watermelon

You can find fresh watermelons between May and September, but they are at their peak from mid-June to late August. To select, choose a firm, symmetrical, unblemished melon with a dull rind, without cracks or soft spots, that barely yields to pressure. Some people swear by the “thump” test, but experts say that method is unreliable for determining ripeness. Rather, look for a pale yellow patch, indicating where the watermelon sat on the ground while ripening on the vine.

Recipes: 
Watermelon Margaritas
Summer Pea, Watermelon, and Farro Salad 
Watermelon-Jalapeno Ice Pops 
Marinated Grilled Chicken Breast with Watermelon-Jalapeño Salsa 
Flank Steak with Grilled Mango and Watermelon Chutney

See More: All About Melons

Plums

Photo: Anna Williams

Plums

A plum’s skin is tart and a little rough, yet its flesh is sweet, soft, and juicy. When you cook plums, something magical happens. The sweetness of the flesh, tartness of the skin, and spectrum of colors come together in harmony. To select, feel for plums that yield slightly to the touch; but don’t squeeze them. Let the fruit sit in your palm. It should give a little. If you buy firmer fruit, though, don’t put it in the refrigerator or the kitchen window—put it in a paper bag in a dark place for a day or two. After the plum is picked, the sugar level remains the same, but the acidity falls, so it only seems sweeter.

Recipes: 
Pork Patties with Plum Sauce and Napa Cabbage Slaw 
Roast Pork Tenderloin with Plum Barbecue Sauce 
Plum Kuchen
Open-Faced Prosciutto and Plum Sandwiches 
Basil Plum Granita

See More: 7 Recipes for Plums

Basil

Photo: Oxmoor House

Basil

There are more than 60 types of basil, all members of the mint family. Basil is available year-round in supermarkets, but summer is the herb’s best season. To select, look for basil that isn’t wilted and doesn’t have dark spots. And if you’re growing your own, be sure to harvest it on a sunny day, as the sun will bring out the essential oils that won’t be present otherwise.

Recipes: 
White Pizza with Tomato and Basil
Coconut and Basil Steamed Mussels 
Purple Basil Lemonade 
Peach and Basil Shortcake 
Basil and Corn Farro Salad

See More: Use Your Basil Bounty

Figs

Photo: Randy Mayor

Figs

Keep figs stored in a perforated plastic bag in the refrigerator's produce drawers, where moisture levels are higher. Figs require little work. Simply give them a good rinse, pat dry, trim the stems, and enjoy.

Recipes: 
Melon and Fig Salad with Prosciutto and Balsamic Drizzle
Apricot-Fig Chutney
Sheep’s-Milk Yogurt Cheesecakes with Grilled Figs and Pistachios 
Honey-Baked Black Mission Figs with Orange and Ginger 
Prosciutto, Fresh Fig, and Manchego Sandwiches

See More: Fantastic Fig Recipes

Tomatoes

Photo: Oxmoor House

Tomatoes

Heirloom is a term used to describe any tomato plant that’s openly pollinated (by wind and bees) and has been cultivated for more than 50 years. Seeds from the best plants are saved at the end of the growing season for future use. They come in many shapes and sizes—from the two-pound beefsteak to cherry tomatoes as tiny as currants. Because they ripen on the vine and are not stored under refrigeration, heirlooms are more likely than hybrids to have succulent flesh. But they vary in texture, running the gamut from firm, and barely seedy to soft and moist. Some seem at once juicy and firm.

Recipes: 
Heirloom Tomato and Avocado Stack
Mr. Stripey Tomato, Arugula, and Pancetta Sandwiches 
Chunky Tomato-Fruit Gazpacho
Grilled Chicken Thighs with Roasted Grape Tomatoes 
Fresh Pea Salad with Radishes, Tomatoes, and Mint

See More: Heirloom Tomato Roundup

Corn

Photo: Oxmoor House

Corn

A type of grass, corn is a New World food. May through September is peak season. To select, a fresh husk is the number one thing to look for. Nice deep brown silk tips or ends mean it’s ripe, but the whole silk shouldn’t be dried up. Open the tip of the husk to see if the kernels are all the way to the end of the ear; kernels should be plump and milky when pinched.

Recipes: 
Grilled Pork Tacos with Summer Corn and Nectarine Salsa
Chilled Fresh Corn Soup with King Crab 
Pinto, Black, and Red Bean Salad with Grilled Corn and Avocado 
Baked Tomatoes with Quinoa, Corn, and Green Chiles 
Shrimp and Corn Cakes with Heirloom Tomato Salsa

Watch: Season's Best: Fresh Summer Corn 

Eggplant

Photo: Oxmoor House

Eggplant

Store eggplant on the countertop—not in the refrigerator. Choose a spot that's away from direct sunlight. Choose a container that allows for circulation, like a vented bowl or perforated bag. Peeling a standard globe or Japanese eggplant is optional. Leave the skin intact for contrast, or remove it for a paler look.

Recipes: 
Grilled Eggplant Sandwiches with Red Onion and Aioli
Falafel-Stuffed Eggplant with Tahini Sauce and Tomato Relish 
Cheesy Brown Rice Gratin with Zucchini and Eggplant 
Turkey Burgers with Roasted Eggplant 
Eggplant Crostini 

Zucchini

Photo: Oxmoor House

Zucchini

Summer is the perfect time to savor just-harvested zucchini. It’s peak season is June through late August, but you may see zucchini in markets in some regions year-round. With its slightly curved cylinder-like shape, this green summer squash is perfect for blending with other ingredients or in simple preparations highlighting the taste of fresh herbs. Because zucchini has a high water content, it doesn’t require much cooking; raw, it adds nice texture to a salad of greens or a crudités plate. Like its yellow summer squash counterpart, zucchini is also a good source of vitamins A and C, and fiber.

Recipes: 
Persian Rice-Stuffed Zucchini with Pistachios and Dill 
Zucchini Angel Hair Pancake 
Grilled Zucchini with Sea Salt
Stuffed Zucchini with Cheesy Breadcrumbs
Zucchini Eggplant Lasagna

See More: Use Your Zucchini

Summer Squash

Photo: Oxmoor House

Summer Squash

Unlike winter squashes, such as butternut or acorn, summer squash has edible skin and seeds. The most common summer varieties are yellow squash (also called crookneck), pattypan squash, and zucchini. Whether you’re gathering them from the backyard or from the supermarket produce bins, choose small, firm squashes with bright-colored, blemish-free skins.

Recipes: 
Summer Squash, Bacon, and Mozzarella Quiche
Grilled Summer Squash
Summer Squash Croquettes
Mixed Greens Salad
Potato Salad with Herbs and Grilled Summer Squash

Blueberries

Photo: Oxmoor House

Blueberries

Of all the popular summer fruits, blueberries have an advantage, nutritionally speaking. They’ve earned the distinction of one of the most potent source of antioxidants, which help counteract heart disease, cancers, and other types of illnesses. Blueberries are also full of fiber and high in vitamin C. To pick the best of the crop, look for powder-blue berries that are firm and uniform in size. Store them in a single layer, if possible, in a moisture-proof container for up to five days, and don’t wash until you’re ready to use them.

Recipes: 
Blueberry Thrill 
Fresh Blueberry Sauce 
Gingered Blueberry Shortcake
Blueberry-Orange Parfaits
Late-Harvest Riesling Sorbet with Berries

See More: Blueberry Desserts

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