Pairing Wine with Chinese Dishes

With all of the sweet and spicy complexity of Chinese food, it’s hard to know what wine is best for pairing. The expert weighs in for these 4 common dishes.

Which wines go best with these Chinese dishes?

Photo: Randy Mayor

Which wines go best with these Chinese dishes?

Whether you prefer to order from your favorite take-out joint or whip out the wok, Chinese food offers the perfect opportunity to reach for bargain bottles with big fruit and hints of sweetness. The richly-layered spicy, sweet, and salty dishes can easily flatten more delicate and nuanced wines.

 

 

Shrimp Fried Rice

Photo: Randy Mayor

Shrimp Fried Rice

If you've ever had fried rice with coconut, mango, or ginger, you know how these exotic flavors enliven this staple dish. An American gewürztraminer adds complementary fruity flavors and sweetness. Plus, this aromatic white stands up to scrambled eggs (often found in fried rice), which challenge many wines.

Fetzer Gewürztraminer California Valley Oaks 2008 (California, $9) Spicy, honeyed, tropical, and a tad sweet (pictured)

Hogue Gewürztraminer Columbia Valley 2008 (Washington, $12) Lychee and citrus with rose petal aromas

SPLURGE: Hermann J. Wiemer Gewürztraminer 2007 (New York, $19) Exotic and floral with melon and mineral flavors

View Recipe: Shrimp Fried Rice

Szechuan Chicken

Photo: Randy Mayor

Szechuan Chicken

Off-dry rieslings are perfect matches for Szechuan peppercorns, which combine aromatic spice and earthy undertones. The wines' fruity sweetness is balanced with acidity.

Pacific Rim Sweet Riesling 2008 (Washington, $10) Lingering, sweet apricot meets crisp acidity (pictured)

Dr. Frank Riesling Semi-dry 2008 (New York, $15) Honeysuckle aromas with apple and tropical fruit

SPLURGE: Gunderloch Riesling Spätlese Diva 2007 (Germany, $25) Peach nectar flavors are bright and fresh

View Recipe: Szechuan Chicken Stir-Fry

Vegetable Lo Mein

Photo: Randy Mayor

Vegetable Lo Mein

Choose a wine with acidity or effervescence to cut through the noodles' oily coating. Sauvignon blancs and sparkling wines are great choices.

Mionetto IL Prosecco (Italy, $10) Fresh and fizzy with a shot of citrus

Brancott Sauvignon Blanc Marlborough 2008 (New Zealand, $14) Zesty citrus with a zippy finish

SPLURGE: Frei Brothers Sauvignon Blanc Reserve 2008 Russian River Valley (California, $20) Generous body, plus hints of pink grapefruit and papaya (pictured)

View Recipe: Vegetable Lo Mein with Edamame and Mustard Greens

Moo Shu Pork

Photo: Randy Mayor

Moo Shu Pork

Strong flavors of cabbage, mushrooms, and hoisin sauce can conflict with dry reds; the potent fruit punch of a slightly chilled, low-tannin Beaujolais muscles into the mix well.

Georges DuBoeuf Beaujolais Villages Nouveau 2009 (France, $9) Juicy, grapey, berry, and cherry (pictured)

Pierre-Marie Chermette Domaine du Vissoux Beaujolais 2007 (France, $19) Refreshing with tangy red fruit

SPLURGE: Guy Breton V.V. Morgon 2007 (France, $23) Medium-bodied with tart cherry and smoky plum

View Recipe: Moo Shu Pork With Mandarin Pancakes

Printed from:
http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/wine/wine-chinese-dishes-00412000079073/