Réveillon Revival

How the Brennan family, among the Crescent City’s most successful restaurateurs, breathed new life into an old French tradition.

  • Print
  • |
  • Email

Modern Réveillon

For New Orleans chefs, Christmas is a time to honor old customs that have migrated from homes to restaurants.

“The Réveillon has evolved,” says Chef John Besh, whose upcoming book My New Orleans will include a chapter on the tradition, and whose Restaurant August is among local eateries that prepare prix-fixe menus throughout December. “This is a chance to really showcase our culture. It gives people like me, who normally do very inventive things, a chance to return to age-old Creole staples.”

Like his counterpart Tory McPhail at Commander’s Palace, Besh looks to antique cookbooks and old restaurant menus for direction. The result is a seven-course menu of elaborate comfort food, including the likes of shellfish étouffée or daube beef stew―“slow-cooked, complex, [with] lots of love,” he says―and desserts such as a white cake layered with bananas Foster and frosted with Creole cream cheese (Louisiana’s unique clabbered cream, similar to sour cream). For his part, McPhail’s prix-fixe menu combines his zeal for locally sourced ingredients with years of tradition in a robust feast likely to feature a spicy gumbo, glazed quail, and bread pudding soufflé with whiskey sauce.

More Ways To Get Cooking Light

Advertisement

 

JavaScript must be enabled to use this Calendar module.

MOST POPULAR
1
100 Ideas for Appetizers

Start the party with these delicious bites that are sure to enliven everyone's appetite.

Phyllo-Wrapped Asparagus with Prosciutto