Bake a Second Batch for the Holidays

This season, make an extra batch of treats for friends, coworkers, charities, or just someone who could use a lift—and pay it forward, sweetly.

Share a Little Sweetness

Photo: Christopher Testani

Share a Little Sweetness

Holiday baking is one of the most joyful traditions of the year, and for this season, we're encouraging more from-the-heart baking. It's a simple idea: When doing your holiday baking this year, bake a second batch and give it to a charity, veterans, a local firehouse, or a friend or family in need. Many of you do this already, but we're hoping that by giving the idea a name, and spreading the word on paper and through social media, we can increase the number of second batches baked for good causes.

We're baking double batches of cakes, cookies, muffins, and bars—one to enjoy and one to share. Join us!

Star Anise Snickerdoodles

Photo: Justin Walker

Star Anise Snickerdoodles

Perfect for Church Groups and Shelters

HOW TO DOUBLE UP: Mix up a double amount of dough in a large bowl. Bake the first batch of cookies on 2 baking sheets in the oven as directed, and keep the unused dough in the fridge as the first batch bakes. Cool baking sheets completely before proceeding with the rest of the dough.

View Recipe: Star Anise Snickerdoodles

Pineapple Shortbread Cakes

Photo: Justin Walker

Pineapple Shortbread Cakes

Special Indulgence for Special Friends

HOW TO DOUBLE UP: Double the filling, but for quality control, make two separate batches of shortbread dough. Also know that these delicious, buttery cakes are a labor of love—and absolutely worth the time you'll spend making them. The most time-consuming part is shaping the cakes; break up the process by making the filling and the dough a couple of days ahead.

View Recipe: Pineapple Shortbread Cakes

Triple-Chocolate Muffins

Photo: Justin Walker

Triple-Chocolate Muffins

Rich Treats for Teachers or Coworkers

HOW TO DOUBLE UP: If you can accommodate 24 muffins at one time, double the batter and bake all at once. If you can only accommodate 12, make just one batch of batter, bake, and start over: Baking powder will lose its efficacy if extra batter has to sit while the first batch bakes.

View Recipe: Triple-Chocolate Muffins

Rum-Raisin Bundt Cake

Photo: Justin Walker

Rum-Raisin Bundt Cake

Drop These Off at Your Local Firehouse

HOW TO DOUBLE UP: Double the batter in a large bowl, and bake everything at the same time. Make a standard-size Bundt for yourself, and for gift-giving, do the second batch as mini Bundts: Spoon about 6 tablespoons batter into each of 6 mini Bundt molds coated with baking spray. Spoon remaining batter into a 10-cup Bundt pan coated with baking spray. Bake both pans on the middle rack. Rotate pans after 15 minutes; the minis will be done in about 20 minutes, and the large one should take the time indicated in the recipe.

View Recipe: Rum-Raisin Bundt Cake

Chocolate-Almond Cheesecake Bars

Photo: Justin Walker

Chocolate-Almond Cheesecake Bars

Great for a Book Club or Any Social Group

HOW TO DOUBLE UP: It's easy to double this recipe all as one process—double the crust, double the filling, divide between pans, and bake both pans together at the same time on the same oven rack. You may find that you need to add a couple of extra minutes to the bake time; cook until almost completely set.

View Recipe: Chocolate-Almond Cheesecake Bars

Eggnog Coffee Cake

Photo: Justin Walker

Eggnog Coffee Cake

Families and Grandparents Will Love This

HOW TO DOUBLE UP: Double the crumble mixture and the cake batter in large bowls. Bake cakes together on the same oven rack, rotating pans halfway through the cook time. If the cakes don't test done after 30 minutes, cook an extra 2 to 6 minutes, checking them every 2 minutes. Either give a whole cake to a friend, or package individual pieces.

View Recipe: Eggnog Coffee Cake

Printed from:
http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/holidays-occasions/bake-second-batch-holidays-00412000086250/