Photo: Trinette Reed / Getty

Boost your intake of fiber, vitamins, and minerals by learning how to eat more vegetables (and fruits). 

April 18, 2017

It's something most of us strive for, eating more vegetables and fruit. While it may be something we say, or even write down as a resolution, it's sometimes easier said than done. These four simple tricks, covering everything from breakfast to dinner to snacks, will help you incorporate more fresh foods into your diet:

 Photo: Jamie Vespa

Boost Breakfast

Add fruits (or veggies) to your breakfast meals and you're already starting the day nutritionally sound. Stir fruit into dishes like oatmeal and cereal, or sprinkle atop toast. Veggie can be also make for easy toast toppers, and great additions to an omelet or bowl of savory oats.

 Photo: Getty

Branch Out

Keep an eye out during your grocery shopping to spot produce that you've never tried. It may be as common as a butternut squash, or as foreign as dragon fruit. By adding a variety of fresh foods to your shopping cart, you'll automatically be adding that to your diet too. And who knows, you may find yourself a new favorite.

 Photo: Colin Price

Snack Smart

As much as we'd like to believe that a bag of potato chips will count as a serving of vegetables, the reality is that your snacks need to be nutritious too. The easiest way to snack on wholesome foods is to literally snack on whole foods. Grab an apple for on the road, slice up a cucumber for dipping in hummus, or steam some edamame to tide you over from lunch to dinner or for late night munching.

Change Your Base

It's easy to rely on the same old dishes again and again. But change things up with the addition of veggies and you'll have a nutritionally sound, though still comfortingly familiar, meal. Use cauliflower as a pizza crust or rice replacer; your family will hardly notice. While you're at it, add a dose of veggies to your pasta bowl with spiralized vegetables, such as carrots or spaghetti squash. And don't forget that an easy plant-based swap is to wrap your regular sandwich filling into a piece of lettuce or kale for a simple green dinner.