Here, the yolk of the fried egg serves as a dressing (without you having to do anything extra) to coat nutrient-dense quinoa. Pancetta adds a snap of savory satisfaction to earthy kale, while all-season cherry tomatoes, meaning you can make it whenever, lend a fresh pop of bright flavor. Sub steel-cut oats, bulgur, or leftover brown rice for quinoa. The hot sauce gives this simple dish a kick in the pants.

Photo: Iain Bagwell

This is pretty hot stuff. 

Timothy Q. Cebula
May 22, 2017

If you like spice, here’s even more reason to add a few dashes of hot sauce to your meal: It can be really good for you. 

Studies have found that capsaicin—the key chemical in spicy ingredients—can help promote a healthy metabolismserve as an anti-inflammatory (as counter-intuitive as that seems), and help prevent chronic diseases. 

A few in-house faves among the most commonly found bottled hot sauces: 

Related: What is Korean Hot Sauce?

When you use it skillfully, hot sauce doesn’t need to set your palate on fire and overwhelm the flavor of the rest of the dish. Start by adding just a drop or two at a time to dishes in process like stews, stir-fries, or eggs, tasting as you go. This way, you’ll get to know how much is just right for you, so you can add it with precision depending on the size of the dish. The vinegar in these sauces make them as much of a seasoning element as a condiment: just like a squeeze of lemon would, a few drops of hot sauce can increase the intensity of other flavors in the dish, while adding a little complementing hot spice. 

Recipe: Egg-Topped Quinoa Bowl with Kale

You May Like