How to Make Homemade Pasta

Make up two batches of hand-rolled homemade noodles―one to eat now, and one to carry you through the week.

Make It Now, Eat All Week

Becky Luigart-Stayner

Make It Now, Eat All Week

Hand-rolled noodles made from scratch really aren't that difficult. Invest an hour or two now and you'll ultimately save more time.

Editor’s Tip: Make two batches at once (mix them separately so you don’t overcrowd your food processor). Enjoy one batch tonight, and freeze the other―in meal-sized portions―for quick and delicious weeknight dinners. Follow our simple steps, and pair them with one of the easy sauces found on the last slide. 

Featured Recipe: Makaruni Pasta with Morel Mushroom Sauce

Step 1: Make Dough

Bill Bettencourt

Step 1: Make Dough

Combine all dry ingredients in a food processor, and slowly add wet ingredients through the food chute with the motor running. Process just until the dough begins to form a ball.

Step 2: Knead Dough

Bill Bettencourt

Step 2: Knead Dough

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface, and knead a few minutes, until the dough is smooth and shiny on the outside, soft throughout (no lumps), and stretchy. Form the dough into a disk, wrap it tightly in plastic wrap, and let it rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. You can store it in the refrigerator for one day, or freeze it for up to six weeks.

Step 3: Form Makaruni

Bill Bettencourt

Step 3: Form Makaruni

Divide dough into 8 equal portions. Divide one portion at a time into 14 equal pieces. Roll each piece between your palms back and forth, into a strand about 2 inches long. Place strands on a well-floured jelly-roll pan. Repeat procedure with remaining dough portions.

Toss and Cook

Bill Bettencourt

Toss and Cook

Bring 6 quarts water to a boil in a large Dutch oven. Place pasta in a sieve and shake off excess flour. Add pasta to pan. Cook for 1 1/2 minutes or until done; drain.

Freeze Your Extra Batch

Bill Bettencourt

Freeze Your Extra Batch

Lightly flour the pasta, and lay it out on trays that fit into your freezer. Freeze just until set, then pack it in small air-tight plastic bags or containers. This makes it easy to portion pasta―if you're cooking for two, put only two servings' worth in each bag.

Don't defrost before you cook the pasta; simply drop the frozen pieces into boiling water. When you cook frozen pasta, always use an additional quart of water so the temperature does not drop when the pasta is added. If the water takes too long to return to a boil, the pasta will stick together in the pot.

Quick Weeknight Sauces

Randy Mayor

Quick Weeknight Sauces

Now that you have a batch of frozen pasta, you can whip up one of these fast and easy sauces during the week for a satisfying meal. Just substitute your homemade noodles for the uncooked pasta called for in the following recipes.

Recipes:
 Orecchiette with Sausage, Peppers, and Feta (pictured)
 Cavatappi with Vodka Sauce
 Fusilli with Tomatoes, Spinach, and Prosciutto

Printed from:
http://www.cookinglight.com/cooking-101/techniques/weekend-pasta-project-00400000001020/