Slide Show: International Braising Recipes

This simple cooking method suits a number of classic international dishes.

Braise around the World

Braise around the World

Braising is used in cuisines around the world, from French and Chinese cooking to dishes from the regional U.S. View some of our favorite global recipes featuring this economical, efficient cooking technique.

More International Braises

Southwestern Pork and Sweet Potatoes
Sweet potatoes mitigate this braise's spicy heat, brought on by the combination of a pickled jalapeño's sour spiciness and the more complex heat of ancho chile powder.

Ropa Vieja
This Cuban stew is made by braising beef until it can be shredded―thus the name (translated as "old clothes"). Serve with tortillas, and pass hot sauce on the side for those who like it fiery. Because the meat is shredded, it's also suitable for tacos and burritos.

Red-Cooked Short Ribs

Red-Cooked Short Ribs

Red cooking refers to a Chinese technique of braising meat in a soy sauce and sherry mixture. The "red" comes from the color soy sauce acquires after long cooking. Steamed rice and green onions are classic accompaniments.

Lamb Shanks with Lemon and White Beans

Lamb Shanks with Lemon and White Beans

This is an excellent example of the way braising benefits tough cuts―lamb shanks are slowly simmered in a flavorful liquid until the meat starts to fall off the bones. Mashed beans thicken the sauce, while lemon juice brightens it. 

Moroccan Chicken Thighs

Moroccan Chicken Thighs

Inspired by North African tagines, this aromatic dish uses skinless, boneless chicken thighs and is ready in a little over an hour. This braise tastes best with dried California apricots; they're brighter and slightly more sour than Turkish ones. Serve over couscous, and garnish with a cilantro sprig for color.

Spanish Daube

Spanish Daube

A daube is a classic aromatic beef braise from the South of France, but here it's crossed with Spanish flavors to offer a new twist on this comfort-food classic. Although one cup may seem like a lot of sherry, its flavors are muted once cooked, and it lends the dish a distinctively Spanish flair.

Coq au Vin

Becky Luigart-Stayner

Coq au Vin

Although traditionally made with an older bird, this French braise is great with supermarket chicken. You can purchase a whole chicken and cut it up (or have the butcher do so), or start with bone-in parts. Meat on the bone offers more flavor than boneless meat and holds up best in braises. An American pinot noir or French burgundy are tasty choices for this dish. You can serve in a bowl over mashed potatoes to soak up the sauce.

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