Pressure Cooker Recipes

This quick worker of wonders has enjoyed a come-back. We’re offering up a new generation of healthy recipes for a new set of pressure cooker fans.

Pressure Cookers

Photo: Jamie Chung

Healthy Pressure Cooker Recipes

There's no denying the appeal of the pressure cooker: slow cooking done faster. Water and steam under high pressure can reduce cooking times by up to 70 percent, which means, at least theoretically, that you could cook a whole chicken in 20 minutes or a potato in eight minutes (theoretically, because some of the setup can add time to the process).

Take advantage of the pressure cooker and try some of these healthy recipes. They can save you significant amounts of time, from 20 minutes to 8 hours.

Read More: A Beginner's Guide to Pressure Cookers

Prosecco and Parmesan Risotto Recipes

Photo: Jamie Chung

Prosecco and Parmesan Risotto

The pressure cooker creates creamy risotto in a hands-free way. We tried this with Carnaroli and Arborio; we liked the forgiving nature of Carnaroli, which remained al dente, while Arborio rice produced a softer grain in the cooker. Don't worry if the rice is a tad runny after cooking—it thickens as it stands before serving.

View Recipe: Prosecco and Parmesan Risotto

1-Hour Spanish Chickpea Soup Recipes

Photo: Jamie Chung

1-Hour Spanish Chickpea Soup

Dried chickpeas are typically soaked overnight and then simmered for up to two and a half hours to become tender. These, though, go into the pressure cooker dry and come out tender in just one hour! Use high-quality, cured Spanish chorizo (and not the fresh or raw Mexican version) for the best flavor and texture in this earthy, satisfying soup.

View Recipe: 1-Hour Spanish Chickpea Soup

Beets with Dill and Walnuts Recipes

Photo: Jamie Chung

Beets with Dill and Walnuts

Beets are ready when they can be pierced with a fork without too much resistance. If they're not quite tender enough, put them back under pressure for a minute or two. Prep the dressing while the beets cook.

View Recipe: Beets with Dill and Walnuts

Chicken Fricassee Recipes

Photo: Jamie Chung

Chicken Fricassee

Don't limit your pressure cooker to stewing tough cuts of beef, pork, or lamb: You can prepare elegant entrées, too, like this chicken with a rich sauce and vegetables. For the best textured vegetables in this dish, allow the carrots, onions, and mushrooms to come to pressure, and then immediately take them off heat and release pressure.

View Recipe: Chicken Fricassee

Beef Pot Roast and Gravy Recipes

Photo: Jamie Chung

Beef Pot Roast and Gravy

A classic pot roast is the "gateway" recipe to using your pressure cooker—it's quick, and you're rewarded with a hearty dish in a fraction of the time. Use the Pressure-Cooker Beef Stock (seen on next slide) here, or substitute 1 (14-ounce) can of fat-free, lower-sodium beef broth plus 1 1/2 cups water in its place. (You'll add about 50 milligrams sodium to each serving with this switch.)

View Recipe: Beef Pot Roast and Gravy

Fast, Rich Pressure-Cooker Beef Stock Recipes

Photo: Jamie Chung

Fast, Rich Pressure-Cooker Beef Stock

Say goodbye to store-bought versions: You can make fat-free, almost no-sodium stocks or broths at home in a snap with your pressure cooker. This beef broth delivers all the savory flavor of the slow-simmered recipe in about one-tenth of the cook time. Chilling the stock—as we advise in our recipe—is an easy way to remove excess fat, but you can also cool the strained liquid slightly and spoon off the excess fat for immediate use.

View Recipe: Fast, Rich Pressure-Cooker Beef Stock

How to Cook Dried Navy Beans in Pressure-Cookers

Photo: Jamie Chung

Great for Beans and Grains

A pressure cooker makes quick work of whole grains and beans, heart-healthy ingredients that often require lots of soaking and cooking. Check your pressure cooker's manual for any specific guidelines about handling beans and grains in your model.

Dried Navy Beans: Versatile with a delicate flavor and texture, navy beans are also high in fiber: 9.6g in just half of cup.

Place 6 cups water, 1 cup dried navy beans, 1 teaspoon olive oil, and 1 bay leaf in pressure cooker. Close lid securely; bring to high pressure over high heat. Adjust heat to medium or level needed to maintain high pressure; cook 40 minutes. Remove from heat; release pressure through steam vent, or place cooker under cold running water to release pressure. Remove lid; drain beans. Discard bay leaf.

How to Cook Brown Rice in Pressure-Cookers

Brown Rice

Brown rice is a nutritional rock star in the rice family, however when cooked traditionally, it requires a long cooking time because the bran is a barrier to water. Significantly reduce the cooking time by using a pressure cooker.

How to: Place 1 1/4 cups water and 1 cup uncooked long-grain brown rice in the pressure cooker. Close lid securely; bring to high pressure over high heat. Adjust heat to medium or level needed to maintain high pressure; cook 17 minutes. Remove from heat; release pressure through steam vent, or place cooker under cold running water to release pressure. Remove lid.

How to Cook Wild Rice in Pressure Cookers

Wild Rice

Wild rice is the only grain native to North America, though it's actually not a rice at all but the seed from an aquatic grass. After cooking, wild rice still has a distinct crunch which makes it an excellent mix-in with more traditional whole grains, such as brown rice.

How to: Place 2 1/3 cups water and 1 1/4 cups uncooked wild rice (1 [8-ounce] package) in pressure cooker. Close lid securely; bring to high pressure over high heat. Adjust heat to medium or level needed to maintain pressure; cook 30 minutes. Remove from heat; release pressure through steam vent, or place cooker under cold running water to release pressure. Remove lid; drain any excess liquid.

How to Cook Kamut in Pressure Cookers

Kamut

Kamut is a primitive high-protein variety of wheat and takes its name from the ancient Egyptian word for wheat. Kamut berries are about twice the size of, but similar in flavor and texture to wheat berries.

How to: Place 3 cups water, 1 1/2 teaspoons canola oil, and 1 cup uncooked kamut in pressure cooker. Close lid securely; bring to high pressure over high heat. Adjust heat to medium or level needed to maintain pressure; cook 10 minutes. Remove from heat; allow pressure to release naturally through steam vent. Remove lid; drain kamut.

How to Cook Pearled Barley in Pressure Cookers

Pearl Barley

Look for pearled barley kernals or berries to add a new starchy side to your recipe repertoire. The cereal's chewy texture enhances soups, pilafs, and salads. Its hearty flavor pairs well with mushrooms, beef, herbs, and tomatoes.

How to: Place 4 1/2 cups water, 1 cup uncooked pearl barley, and 1 tablespoon canola oil in pressure cooker. Close lid securely; bring to high pressure over high heat. Adjust heat to medium or level needed to maintain pressure; cook 18 minutes. Remove from heat; allow pressure to release naturally through steam vent. Remove lid; drain barley.

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